HOME | UITGEBREID ZOEKEN | INSTANT PRINT | CONTACT | INLOGGEN | KLANTENSERVICE | LEVERING | BETALING
winkelwagen   Winkelwagen

Uw winkelwagen is leeg.

 

Alles voor Hoorn:

Tip!

The art of french horn playing
Farkas
 


 
in voorraad

25.14 €    

 
 
Wednesday 21 November 2018

Momenteel zijn onze winkels gesloten. Morgen zijn wij terug open vanaf 10u.

Hebt u vragen?

Stuur ons een e-mail!
Wij beantwoorden uw vraag zo snel mogelijk.

Onze openingsuren

 
Kwaliteitsgarantie

Het Unizo E-commerce Label waarborgt dat u in vertrouwen kan winkelen op deze webshop.

Meer weten...

 
crumb crumb crumb

Gaetano Donizetti: Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42

Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42. Donizetti, Gaetano
 
Titel

Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42

Componist

Gaetano Donizetti  (1797 - 1848)

Bewerker

Gallay, Jacques-Francois

Bezetting

Hoorn en piano

Uitgever Plumstead Peculiars Press
Bestelbaar Dit artikel is niet (meer) in voorraad. De levertermijn is niet bekend. Art.-no. 107135

Onze winkels in Antwerpen en Leuven
Actuele voorraadstatus per winkel:
 
levertijd onbekendAntwerpen
levertijd onbekendLeuven

 
28.00
zet op uw verlanglijstje
 

Donizetti's Les martyrs was his first work written especially for Paris and premiered at the Opéra in 1840. It is a reworking of his ill-fated Il Poliuto which he wrote for Teatro San Carlo (Naples) in 1838, which was censored due to its subject matter (the martyrdom ofSaint Polyeuctus) and therefore never performed. Gallay's Fantaisie, published in 1841, opens with a muted quote from the Act III Chœur et Finale ‘Hymne à Jupiter' which is answered by a contemplative recitativo style section. Sévère's Act II aria ‘Amour de mon jeune ange' provides the lilting Larghetto theme which is followed by an Allegro moderato taken from another aria for the same character, this time from Act II, ‘Je te perds, toi que j'adore'. Polyeucte's Act II aria ‘Dieu puissant qui voit mon zèle' is heard in the Adagio prior to the return of ‘Je te perds…'. Throughout the work a short dotted rhythmic figure appears which may hark back to the cry of "Ju-pi-ter" from the final chorus of Act II..