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Gaetano Donizetti: Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42

Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42. Donizetti, Gaetano
 
Title

Fantaisie sur une cavatine de Belisario de Donizetti, Op.42

Composer

Gaetano Donizetti  (1797 - 1848)

Arranged by

Gallay, Jacques-Francois

Instrumentation
Publisher Plumstead Peculiars Press
Available to order This item is not in stock for the moment. The delivery time is unknown. SKU: 107135

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Donizetti's Les martyrs was his first work written especially for Paris and premiered at the Opéra in 1840. It is a reworking of his ill-fated Il Poliuto which he wrote for Teatro San Carlo (Naples) in 1838, which was censored due to its subject matter (the martyrdom ofSaint Polyeuctus) and therefore never performed. Gallay's Fantaisie, published in 1841, opens with a muted quote from the Act III Chœur et Finale ‘Hymne à Jupiter' which is answered by a contemplative recitativo style section. Sévère's Act II aria ‘Amour de mon jeune ange' provides the lilting Larghetto theme which is followed by an Allegro moderato taken from another aria for the same character, this time from Act II, ‘Je te perds, toi que j'adore'. Polyeucte's Act II aria ‘Dieu puissant qui voit mon zèle' is heard in the Adagio prior to the return of ‘Je te perds…'. Throughout the work a short dotted rhythmic figure appears which may hark back to the cry of "Ju-pi-ter" from the final chorus of Act II..